Northland, NZ

After seeing the awesome Kauri trees, we headed north to the northern tip of New Zealand, then drove back down to Auckland on the east side of the north cape. Here’s a little blog about our time in Northland.

image
We took a little ferry across a harbour on our way north
image
Our first experience with very crowded campgrounds in New Zealand! We're just south of the northern tip of the north island.
image
Even though the campground was crowded, the beach was really beautiful and empty.
image
We did a little hike up to a lookout from our campsite
image
One of those crazy coincidences. When my dad saw their MEC tent, he asked them what part of Canada they were from. They answered "from a little town near Peterborough Ontario"! He, Brendan, was originally from Ireland, and she, Emanuelle, was French, and they live in Hastings (30 minutes from our house!) They were very nice, and we started chatting with them. Then we realized that we had some friends in common! Crazy, eh? He was a doctor, which was very helpful because my dad had an infection in his foot. My dad lay face first in the grass of the campground while Brendan cut the boil open with his swiss army knife - fixed it perfectly!
image
Here we are are the north tip of the north island, Cape Reinga.
image
When two oceans mix, the waves go all funny. The Pacific Ocean is on the right, and the Tasman Sea on the left.
image
This lone tree (look carefully) is very special in Maori culture. They believe that that's where their spirits go when they die, before returning to the ocean.

After Cape Reinga, we headed south (not like we had any choice!). We did a 20 minute hike up to a view point called St. Paul’s Rock.

image
Yeah, it was pretty steep!
image
The panoramic view from the top - you really need to click on this one to see it.

image

That night, we found a place on a lovely beach to camp. Our understanding was that in New Zealand, if there are no “No Camping” signs, you can stay there as long as you clean up after yourself.

image

image
Some Maori folks came by the beach to collect cockles. Cockles are like little clams. The people were very welcoming and friendly, and even gave us a bunch of cockles! They also told us where we could find oysters. I tried a raw cockle... I would describe the taste as "it tastes the way the ocean smells"!
image
We had our first fire in a long time! I much preferred the cockles cooked, they were delicious.

The next morning, before leaving camp, we visited a cemetery just up the hill that the cockle-collectors had told us about the night before. Maori people decorate their graves very nicely!
When we were just about to leave, another Maori woman came by in her truck. She was mad and told us that we were NOT allowed to camp there. She told us that the gate was supposed to be locked, and it wasn’t. We were camping on Maori land. She was worried about where we were going to the bathroom, because that beach is a food beach. When my dad explained that we were going in the woods behind, she told us that there had been a big Maori battle there many years ago, and so their ancestors bones laid there. It’s also near the Maori cemetery.
She left, and so did we. We headed into Rawhiti (pronounced Rafiti), the nearest town to fill up water. Turns out, Rawhiti wasn’t much… just a campground! Turns out, That lady was the manager of the campground! No wonder she was mad. We were camping on her sacred land, instead of paying at the Maori-run campground 2 km down the road! We apologized to her about what we did. She had a reason to be mad, although we had no way of knowing that we were doing something wrong. It’s interesting that the cockle-collectors the previous night had been so welcoming. I think it’s because they weren’t from Rawhiti, they were just visiting from other places and heard that it was a good cockle beach. This experience was our first insight into Maori culture, rights and land.

Then we drove south down towards Auckland. In Auckland, we got a new Bluetooth keyboard for blogging, because the one we bought in Peterborough started to go a bit wonky (the enter key stops working, then the shift key, then the space bar). Now it’s working a lot better, so with our two keyboards, the phone and tablet, we can “double-blog”, to try and get caught up on our blog entries!
That night we drove southeast towards a place called Rotorua. It also happened to be New Years Eve! We camped beside a very nice river, see our blog entry: https://1year1family1world.com/2014/12/31/2015-is-great-trust-us/  to see what we did.
New Years Day, we went to a blue hole to swim in. It was freezing! There were lots of people there, but not a lot of them swam! Most of them just went to see the blue hole and have a picnic.

image
The blue hole was about ten minutes walk from the car park. It's in cow country- not where you would expect to see a crystal clear pool!
image
It was really cold! I am writing this in Queensland Australia, during a heatwave summer (36 degrees Celsius), and the cold pool looks pretty inviting. I'm sure those of you reading this in Canada right now don't feel the same way!
image
A fun New Years day. Things look good for 2015!

Kaia

Kauri: Géants de la foret

For you English readers, I’m writing this blog in French but I’m translating the captions so you can understand the general idea.  It’s about the kauri trees of northern New Zealand.

La région au nord de la ville d’Auckland sur l’ile nord de la Nouvelle Zélande est connu pour ses arbres kauri.  Ce sont des énormes pins qui poussent plusieurs fois plus hauts que les autres arbres dans la foret, et plusieurs fois plus épaisses aussi.  Notre deuxième jour en NZ, on paissait près d’un musée de kauri, donc ça a été notre première activité dans le pays.  On a eu un tour du musée, et on a appris beaucoup à propos des arbres, et les deux grandes ressources qu’ils offraient aux gens: la gomme et le bois.

La gomme de kauri est très précieux, et vers l’an 1900, beaucoup d’hommes sont allés travailler dans la foret pour la chercher, la polir et la vendre. Il y avait quelques façons pour la chercher.  Certains hommes grimpaient les arbres avec des piques à main et des bottes avec des piques (un peu comme grimper un mur de glace).  Ensuite, ils faisaient des coupures dans le tronc et la laissait saigner la gomme, et ils retourneraient pour la chercher plus tard.  D’autres hommes utilisaient de longues cannes pour trouver la gomme qui est tombé des arbres plusieurs ans plus tôt et était enterré en terre et en boue.  Ils mettaient leur canne dans la terre, la retiraient et sentaient le bout pour l’odorat de la gomme. Si il y en avait, ils la déterraient.  Ce n’était pas du tout un métier facile car ils travaillaient souvent dans un marais et creusaient souvent en utilisant que leurs mains!

image
le musée a une énorme collection de gomme de kauri poli.---The museum has an enormous collection of polished kauri gum.

image

image
Pour faire la gomme encore plus belle, certaines personnes la faisait fondre et ont ajouté des insectes ou des feuilles avant de la redurcir.---To make the gum even more beautiful, some people melted the gum and added insects and leaves before rehardening it again.

Le guide nous a ensuite amené à la chambre du bois de kauri.  On a appris beaucoup plus au sujet de cette industrie.  Les hommes allaient loin dans la foret en équipes de deux pour trouver l’arbre le plus grand, et passaient des heures, parfois des jours à la couper en utilisant une grande scie à main.

image
Cet homme a encore beaucoup de travail a faire!---this man still has a lot of work to do!
image
Cet énorme tronc est sur un chariot sur une voie ferrée pour le transporter. Une équipe de taureau le tirait en montant, mais pour descendre, deux hommes fallaient le monter pour le relentir en utilisant un frein a main!---This huge log is on a train cart to transport it. A bullock team would pull it uphill, but going downhill, two men had to lie beside and in front of the log on the cart to slow it down using a handbrake!
image
Voici un diagramme des tailles des troncs des plus grands arbres qui ont jamais été trouvé. Malheureusement, seulement les deux plus petits sur ce diagramme n'ont pas été coupés.---Here's a scale to show the sizes of the biggest kauri tree trunks ever found. Unfortunately though, only the two smallest ones on this scale weren't cut down.

On est ensuite allé dans une chambre où il y avait des sculptures et des modèles faits avec le bois de kauri.

image
Cet énorme table est fait avec un seul morceau de bois!---This huge table is made from a single piece of wood!
image
Ces petits bols sont faits de bois de kauri trouvé sous la terre qui a 30 millions ans!---These little bowls are carved out of kauri wood found underground that's 30 million years old!
image
Ce bois vient d'un arbre qui est tombé après d'être frappé par un éclair.---This wood comes from a tree that came down after being struck by lightning.

À la fin de la tournée, on est allé dans une salle qui a l’air d’un moulin de bois.  Il y avait aussi un modèle d’un genre d’hôtel dans le temps de l’industrie de kauri pour les gens qui devaient visiter.  Ce n’était pas du tout pour les hommes qui travaillaient dans la foret, mais pour les
hommes d’affaires, ou ceux qui achetaient la gomme et le bois de kauri.  On pouvait entrer et voir les différentes sortes de personnes qui y allaient.

Après le musée,  on est allé au foret de kauri pour voir l’arbre le plus grand encore vivant, Tane Mahuta, un nom maori qui se traduit en “Roi de la Foret”.  Notre guide au musée nous a suggéré d’aussi aller voir l’arbre le plus épais, Te Matua Ngahere, qui signifie “Père de la foret”, qui est moins d’un kilomètre de Tane Mahuta.  Leur grandeur est étonnante.  Ils te font sentir comme une fourmi à côté d’un éléphant!

image
On est en train d'admirer Te Matua Ngahere.---We are admiring Te Matua Ngahere.
image
Voici quatre grands arbres qui poussent très proche ensemble, appelés "Les Quatre Soeurs".---These four tall trees growing very close together are known as "The Four Sisters".
image
Ces arbres sont énormes, mais à cause de la déforestation, leur nombre a diminué beaucoup les derniers 100 ans. Heureusement, récemment des efforts de conservations font qu'ils deviennent de plus en plus communs---Though the tres themselves are huge, their numbers have declined a lot due to deforestation in the past 100 years. Fortunately though, recent conservation efforts are making them beccome more and more common.

image

image

image
Voici les dimensions de Te Matua Ngahere.---Here are the dimensions of Te Matua Ngahere.

Une des choses qui fait le kauri très particulier est sa transformation de forme.  L’arbre a évolué en même temps que le moa géant (un oiseau un peu comme une autruche qui a été chassé à l’extinction par les maoris), donc quand l’arbre est jeune et ses aiguilles sont durs et ne sont pas bons pour manger, il a le forme d’un sapin.  Mais quand l’arbre grandit et ses aiguilles deviennent bonnes pour manger, ça prend la forme d’un “lollypop” (comme notre guide au musée l’appelait) pour que le moa ne peut pas atteindre les aiguilles.

image
Nous sommes devant un jeune arbre kauri.---Us in front of a young kauri tree.

La déforestation des kauris est un effet classique de la colonisation des européens.  Quand ils sont arrivés en NZ, il y en avait tant d’arbres qu’ils les ont coupé sans limites jusqu’à ce qu’il y en avait presque plus.  Exactement comme plusieurs exemples au Canada comme les pins blancs et la traite de fourrure de castor.  Les kauris poussent très lentement, donc si leurs nombres vont récupérer, ça prendrait des centaines ou même des milliers d’années.  J’aime être à côté de choses vivants si grands car ça me fait sentir tellement petit.  Les arbres kauri sont tellement cool et préhistoriques.  Ils ont existé pour des millions d’années, et j’espère qu’ils existeront pour longtemps dans le futur aussi.

Jake